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Rbreb13

M$ Word Tips and Tricks

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Paste plain text

When you copy and paste text from a Web page or another document, the text brings its formatting into your document. To get around that behavior, copy the text and place the cursor where you want to insert the copy. Then, open the Edit menu, choose Paste Special, and select the Unformatted Text option.

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Plug a Security Leak

Under Microsoft Windows 2000 or Windows XP, the first few lines of an encrypted, password-protected Word 2002 document can be viewed by anyone with access to the user's files. One of the summary fields associated with a document is Title, and the default value for this field is the file's first line or two. This field appears as part of the file's ToolTip in Windows Explorer, and it can be viewed on the Summary tab in the file's Properties dialog.

Here's how to hide the Title field of your protected files. After clicking on Tools | Security Options in the Save As dialog, click on the Advanced button. In the resulting Encryption Type dialog box, select any encryption method except the first two (Weak Encryption and Office 97/2000 Compatible). This will enable the Encrypt document properties check box. Check it, and click on OK. Now the Title field's data is hidden from snoopers.

It does seem pointless to encrypt a secret document but leave its first few lines in plain view! Note that a file encrypted as described here can be opened only with Word 2002, not with previous versions.

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Print envelopes

Want to address your envelopes in the printer? Type an address in a blank document or open a letter. Open the Tools menu and select Envelopes And Labels. Click the Envelopes tab, enter the return address if you want one, and click Print.

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Print multiple pages on one sheet

If you regularly print large documents or send printed copies of them through the mail, you can save on both paper and postage by using Word's Zoom feature. With Zoom, you can print as many as 16 pages on a single sheet of paper. Printing multiple pages on one sheet also makes it easier to check your document's page layout, such as odd and even page headers and footers in a 200-page document.

Follow these steps to print four pages to a sheet:

1. Go to File | Print.

2. In the Zoom section, select 4 Pages from the Pages Per Sheet drop-down list.

3. Make any other print selections, and click OK.

Zoom automatically reduces the scale to fit four pages on each sheet. Zoom reduces the size of your printout without changing the document's format or page layout settings.

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Print on a different paper size

You can use Page Setup to change the paper size for an existing document, but Word doesn't automatically fit each page to the new size. You may need to fit the pages manually by adjusting the document's page breaks and layout. With Word's Zoom feature, you can print a document on a different paper size without making permanent adjustments to the layout.

Zoom automatically scales each page of the document to fit the new paper size. For example, to print an 8 1/2 by 11 inch letter-sized document on A5 (148 x 210 mm) paper, follow these steps:

1. Go to File | Print.

2. Click the Scale To Paper Size drop-down list under Zoom, and select A5.

3. Make any other print selections, and click OK.

Zoom automatically scales the document's fonts, graphics, and margins to print on the smaller A5 paper, while retaining all of the original document's page layout and page break settings.

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Print on Non-Avery Labels

Avery is the default manufacturer for labels in Word 2000. If you purchase labels made by another company, you can find your brand in Word's database by choosing Tools, Envelopes And Labels, then clicking the Labels tab. Click the Options button, and under Label Products you have a choice of nearly a dozen of the leading manufacturers. Select your product manufacturer from this list, then you'll be able to choose your Product Number from the list in the lower-left corner.

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Print Originals and Duplicates in Word

I have to print four copies of bills and invoices. I want the word Original to appear on top of the first copy and Duplicate to appear on subsequent copies. Is there a way to make this happen automatically, either in Excel or in Word?

This problem may be solved by a nonstandard application of Microsoft Word's Mail Merge feature. Normally, Mail Merge is used to print multiple copies of a letter, each with a different address, salutation, and so on. We'll create a Mail Merge document with four as-if recipients, one named Original and three named Duplicate.

In Word 2002, choose Tools | Letters and Mailings | Mail Merge Wizard. Click the Next link on the lower-right-hand side twice, thereby accepting the default settings to create letters, starting with the current document. On the Select recipients page, check Type a new list and click on Create. Enter the name for each of the four entries (Original, Duplicate, Duplicate, Duplicate) in the First Name field, clicking on New Entry after all but the last. When you click on Close, Word saves your recipient list to the filename you specify. Word will prompt you to select and sort recipients; just make sure that all are selected and click on OK.

Now click on Next and write your letter. Most likely, you will copy and paste from your existing bill or invoice. Put the cursor at the spot where you want to see the word Original or Duplicate. Click on the More Items link in the wizard, choose First Name, and click on Insert followed by Close. Then format the text as you wish. Click on the Next link to preview the merged document, and click on Next again to complete the merge. On the last page of the wizard, simply click on Print to print the four copies. The next time you do this, it will be easier, because you can reuse the recipient list you have saved.

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Print to a different printer with the Print To File option

Suppose you want to send a document to a printer on a network that's different from the default printer. When you try to print the original document on the new printer, some of the formatting may be missing or incorrect.

Instead of printing the original document, use the Print To File feature to create a file that contains all the commands and information the new printer will need to print the document correctly. To create this file, first install the printer driver for the destination printer on your machine.

Then, follow these steps:

1. Open the file in Word, and go to File | Print.

2. Select the name of the destination printer from the drop-down Name text box.

3. Select the Print To File check box, and click OK.

4. In the Print To File dialog box, choose a folder from the Save In text box.

5. Give the file a maximum six-character filename, and click OK.

Word automatically adds the .prn extension to the file. To print the .prn file, use the DOS COPY command. For example, if you've saved Myfile.prn in C:\My Documents, enter the following at the command prompt:

COPY C:\MYDOCI~1\myfile.prn LPT1 /B

The COPY command requires the full DOS pathname for the file, which you can obtain by right-clicking the file and selecting Properties. The /B switch sends the commands and characters in binary format to the destination printer.

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Protect text from changes

Suppose you want to allow a number of other users to open, review, and edit your Word 2000 document. However, there's a paragraph or section that you want to make off-limits to changes. To protect a specific block of text while allowing changes to the rest of the document, put that block of text into its own section and password-protect access to it. Here's how.

1. Put the cursor in front of the first character of text you want to protect. Then, go to Insert | Break, click Continuous under Section Break Types, and click OK.

2. Move the cursor to the end of the block you want to protect and repeat Step 1.

3. Click anywhere within the new section, then look for the section's number in the bottom-left corner of the Word window.

4. Go to Tools | Protect Document, click Forms, and click the Sections button to display the Section Protection dialog box.

5. By default, all sections are selected; deselect all sections except the one you want to protect, and click OK.

At this point, you can add a password if you want to prevent a clever reviewer from unprotecting your section. Whether you set a password, click OK to close the Protect Document dialog box. Thereafter, until you unprotect that section, the cursor will refuse to land within the protected text. Reviewers can see, but not change, that section.

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Quick Field Toggle

Press [Alt][F9] to quickly toggle field code display on and off.

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Quick table column total

Put the cursor in the last cell in a column of numbers. Open the Table menu, select Formula, and press [Enter] to accept the default Sum function.

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Quickly indent paragraphs and lists

Although you can use the Paragraph dialog box or the Ruler, using the Formatting toolbar's Increase Indent or Decrease Indent buttons may be the quickest method to indent paragraphs or lists.

Clicking the Increase Indent or Decrease Indent buttons increases or decreases the indent from the left margin by one tab stop. But this function isn't limited to the default half-inch tab stops. To change the size of the indent used by the Increase Indent and Decrease Indent buttons, simply change the tab stops.

Word 2002 adds a drag-and-drop method for indenting numbered or bulleted lists. To try this method, position your cursor over a bullet or number in the list, and click and drag the mouse. When you do, a vertical dotted line that extends the length of the document window to the Ruler will appear. Drag the mouse to the right or left until the dotted line reaches the desired position on the Ruler. The entire list will be indented to that position.

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Quickly move around in a document

To move to the top of a document, press [Ctrl][Home]. To move to the bottom of a document, press [Ctrl][End]. To go to the top of the next page, press [Ctrl][Page Down]. For the top of the preceding page, press [Ctrl][Page Up].

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Remove Many Links at Once

I regularly work with large Word documents that start out as HTML documents, and they contain hundreds of hyperlinks. I know how to remove one link at a time by moving the cursor to the link, hitting Ctrl-K to bring up the Edit Hyperlink dialog, and then choosing the Remove Link button. But when I have to remove hundreds of links, this takes a maddeningly long time. Is there a faster way to get rid of the hyperlinks?

You can remove all of the links with just two keystrokes: Ctrl-A to select the entire document and Ctrl-Shift-F9 to convert all the links into text. This technique works with other fields as well, turning a field into text using the field result. For example, if you've inserted a date field to show the current date, selecting the field and pressing Ctrl-Shift-F9 will turn it into text so the date won't change from one day to the next.

If you have other fields in your document along with the hyperlinks and you don't want to convert those fields to text, you can select a portion of the document, being careful not to include the fields you don't want to convert, and then press Ctrl-Shift-F9, repeating as many times as necessary for the entire file. This isn't as easy as giving the command for the entire document at once, but it is still faster than removing each link individually. By the way, a somewhat quicker way to remove a single link than the Ctrl-K method is to right-click on the link and choose Remove Hyperlink from the context menu.

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Remove Word's Pesky Horizontal Line

In several places, my Word document has a horizontal line that I did not enter and do not want. I can't remove the line, because the cursor moves right through it. Even though I can't delete the line, pressing Enter above it moves it down—as if I can see the line but Word can't. How do I get rid of this line? Is there some way I can look at individual characters and delete them one at a time?

What you're seeing is not a line of characters or even a drawing object. Rather, it's a border. By default, if you enter three or more hyphens (-), underscores (_), equal signs (=), or asterisks (*) followed by a carriage return, Word automatically gives the current paragraph a thin, thick, double, or dotted bottom border. You must have done this accidentally.

To get rid of the line, put the cursor directly above it and select Borders and Shading from the Format menu. Click the None box and click OK. To prevent the automatic insertion of borders, select AutoCorrect Options from the Tools menu, click the AutoFormat As You Type tab, and uncheck Border lines. In Word 97, the menu item is AutoCorrect and the check box is labeled simply Borders.

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Rename an existing document

Use Save As. When you need to use an existing document as the basis for a new one, don't overwrite the old document. As soon as you open it, press [Alt]F and then press A. (Or open the File menu and choose Save As.) Then immediately type a new name or change some part of the old one.

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